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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
concentration in technology, we are offering the cheapest electricity in sunny areas compared to other systems. >> the award was presented to this solar entrepreneur as the industry faces tough times. a former prize winner's solar energy business is shedding around 1000 jobs. sma makes solar-technology components called power converters, essential into putting power into the grid. chinese composition and cuts to subsidies have hit his company hard. >> we need the government to support -- to provide support for german manufacturers. we need stronger funding for research and development, and we need an easy way to access funds. >> researchers agree. they are already experimenting with technology they say could bring even more light into their mini-panel, the kind of break through the company needs to compete. >> it time for a brief look at some of the other stories making news around the world. israel has launched three air strikes on gaza. the israeli military says it was targeting our rocket-launching site and militant base. the exchange of fire comes three days after both sides accepted an un
the sensata technologies plant to protest plans to move the factory to china, ending 170 jobs. a federal appeals court has rejected the group plan. his challenge of a funding ban in taxes. texas has sought to cut payments to planned parenthood and exclude it from a government funded health program for low- income women because it also provides abortions. the texas program offers cancer and health screenings as well as birth control to some 100,000 low-income women, about 40,000 of whom are served through planned parenthood. the court of appeals for the but circuit in new orleans declined to reconsider an earlier ruling upholding the ban. in response, texas governor rick perry immediately announced that texas will stop all payments to program participants affiliated with abortion providers. a recent george washington university study has warned texas will be unlikely to provide adequate care to the patients currently served by planned parenthood. the supreme court is set to decide today on whether to hear a challenge to the conviction of five former top officials with the holy land founda
. but this election is different. today digital technology has given campaigns the ability to take that data and target voters with a precision never before possible. says aristotle ceo john phillips. >> we've been targeting voters for a long time, campaigns have been. what's different about it now? >> a couple of things that have changed. 2012 is a watershed year. what's changed is that the campaigns have found that by using powerful computers and sophisticated software that they are able to quickly sift through these mountains of data and slice and dice the electorate to break down that mass of voters to just the people you want to reach and talk to them about something that is relevant. the magic of the big data is the one-to-one targeting. >> reporter: how is the targeting a guy like me? i'm a ridgesterred independent in a battle ground state. >> it starts with the registered voter. the d.n.a. of the electorate. >> reporter: your name, address, gender, race. that's all in the registered voter file. it's available to the campaign. >> now on top of the registered voter file, there might be
in the world. we're blessed with terrific soldiers and extraordinary technology and intelligence. but the idea of a trillion dollars in cuts through sequestration and budget cuts to the military would change that. we need to have strong allies. our association and -- and connection with our allies is essential to america's strength. we're the -- the great nation that has allies, 42 allies and friends around the world. and finally, we have to stand by our principles. and if we're strong in each of those things, american influence will grow. but unfortunately, in nowhere in the world is america's influence greater today than it was four years ago. >> all right. >> and that's because we've become weaker on each of those four dimensions. >> all right -- perfect. you're going to get a chance to respond to that because that's a perfect segue into our next segment, and that is what is america's role in the world. and that is the question. what do each of you see as our role in the world? and i believe, governor romney, it's your turn to go first. >> well, i -- i absolutely believe that america has a
about by forces that are larger than our own society, globalization, the reach of technology and channg demographics. and within that, i felt that america was at a time when we desperately needed to have the strongest possible value space. we needed to be more in touch with the best of the american idea, the best aspects of the american idea. >> brown: value space you say. well, i say the value space. the space where we talk about why we do things, not what we're going to do. i felt that space had emptied out. we had had a very tough first decade of this century. i thought the conservate vision of small government, low tas, big defense, had played itself out and that progressives, liberals, we were flat on our back. >> brown: you use this term hand making i implies a sense of craft, a hands-on. your own background i know from being involved in folklore and music. >> yes. i'm a folklorist and amuse i cannologist. that colors my perspective. i reach back for the foundation of my argument to the late 19th century, to that other transition, the industrial revolution, and the krettics who p
sciences, and technology. >> off to the world of fashion now, which this we can be found not on the catwalks of milan, paris, or new york, but in south africa. >> that is right. african as well as international labels are showcasing the latest designs at the fashion week in johannesburg. >> african fashion has lately swung into the international spotlight with design is replacing bold colors and patterns with more contemporary designs. >> modern and confident -- the latest in south african fashion. the show was the hit of the festival. her cutting its creations have wowed critics. >> the techniques that i use, they make you feel -- like this one is not like what we know or what our people know. >> she is not the only hit designer here. african fashion has never been more popular. designers from ghana, morocco, and 10 other african countries have been showing off their creations in johannesburg. behind the scenes, for has been flying. african fashion is plugged into international trends. >> i am very excited because are looking and also the ladies, so i am hopingrything es
need to have manufacturing done close to where the customer is. second, the increase in technology that we are bringing into manufacturing every day makes us far more productive. >> working experience of actors in hollywood does not have a whole lot in common with factory workers in chicago on the face of it. while you are not likely to see much of the economic downturn on the big screen, its effects are real in los angeles. >> i came out here with 15 people, three of them are still here. two of us are working. so that's the reality of it. staying in the race. >> hollywood has always been about chasing the dream. that belief that the hard work and talent of an individual can win out feels remarkably strong across america. skip is a turkey farmer in northeast ohio. >> people want to work and they want to realize what their future is. they want a good future and they will get it. anybody can do it. you can do anything in this country. just work. but they have to have that opportunity. >> a lot of people who unspoken seem to have far more faith in their ability to make a difference to
change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think macadamia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con goes to talk to a kid. i sometim
for the teaching of english. and we are beginning to see more in the way of exchanges. modern technology has made an elective education a reality. i saw this firsthand. in an engineering competition and the university of colorado. american companies are actively involved in the kingdom's effort to improve k-12 curriculum. keep in mind that saudi arabia is spending 26% of their budget on education. it is third-seeded american educators and businesses are supporting in a big way this modernization effort. there is a careful manage before. saudi arabia took note of this and the government moved with a 138 billion program, all targeted towards the needs and concerns of the populations. i realized that there was criticism in some circles. as if they were buying half the population with increased subsidies. but i have to say but i have to say that the government response was much more sophisticated than that. at the time, we, in the embassy, we listen listened to the top issues facing the saudi arabian population with jobs, houses, will society, and the security apparatus. after it was announced, the p
landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints that are traditional media do. and i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others. when they have classified information that they think would it -- jeopardize information to believe they bring the fact
transactions to a different, a different entity, a different central clearing entity. well, the technology of that is not really well understood at all, and it's hard to have confidence in that. but moreover, it's not clear that without some kind of government sponsorship or government backing or access the liquidity a central clearing facility will have the confidence to avoid, essentially, what would be a run. and while dodd-frank actually provides for some support to central clearing entities -- which, by the way, seems to go mostly unnoticed by critics who say, you know, we've eliminated government support, we've eliminated taxpayer support, we've eliminated the possibility of too big to fail -- we do have a provision that permits intervention to help in a modest way financial, financial utilities like central clearing facilities. however, that's not universal. there's no provision made in europe to support whether directly or indirectly any central clearing facility. so in my mind we've created a series of risks within the derivatives area that were nonexistent before we began this en
: technology, carl cameron, rolling on the bus. carl, thank you. ♪ ♪ >> bret: this is a fox news alert. late breaking details in the ongoing scandal on the attack of the u.s. consulate on benghazi, libya, that killed the u.s. ambassador and three others there. fox news obtained a new document that sheds new light on the days before that attack. chief white house correspondent ed henry is live at the white house with the latest. >> good evening, bret. this is a cable sent to secretary of state clinton's office at the state department showing that there was emergency meeting on august 15 at the u.s. mission in benghazi. significant because that is less than a month before the terror attack there. at this emergency meeting we're told, based on the cable, there was concern expressed by officials on the ground in benghazi that there were al-qaeda training camps there. there could be problems for from that. the cable says the regional security officer expressed concern with the ability to defend the post in event of the coordinated attack due to limited manpower, security measures, weapons capabil
that we see and how much of it is what is ta ted about it as structural issues, changing technology,ed globalization, a kind of new normal that we've heard about from many pple? >> well -- >> i think-- hold on, let me go withpustan goolsbee here first. >> okay. >> okay, so two parts of the how much of the unemployment rate is coming from structural, i think not that high. i do think that is the thing that the economy is going to have to do. the fundamental reason why this recession loo a lot a like the 2001 recovery and not the 1983 recovery is we can't go back to doing what we were doing before the recession began. just as in 2001 a bubble popped and then you're trying to shift what the economy is doing. so there is some element of that. but we also have b got a significant component as i saof the whole world has slowed down. the u.s. growth rate while not fast enough is faster than the rest of the advanced world. so we've got to find a way to get ourselves boosted up where we're not getting any support from being leng to increase our exports to other countries when that is exactly th
agencies going against massive markets just tsai eight -- short of 700 trillion not even that technology and other wise but we have $200 million budget and it seems to me one of the big problems we have is to defund the agency's. you don't have the resources and neither does the cftc. i know you cannot say that so neat and will not ask you to comment but anybody who cares about the capital markets like tv diamond says he is should be advocating for more money for the agency's. you cannot do that. others can. leave aside your budget request and constraints come theoretically if it had the budget it needed what would that budget the? your term is coming to an end. [laughter] it would put in context of what you really need is people who care should focus. >> every year we do submit a budget we think we need to do the job. we frequently do not get that number because of the budget process. we are open and honest what we need to do if we don't get that what we will not be able to do. in my almost four years we have invested heavily and thin technology because that was in the dismal state but
, technology, hacking into our computers, counterfeiting our goods. >> our trade with china suffers from two realities and the disparity between them, namely china's trade surplus and america's deficit. this problem drew similar responses from both candidates. president obama emphasized his record of bringing cases against china to the world trade organization, the wto, while seeking redress for unfair trade practices. governor romney emphasized his plan of levying tariffs against chinese imports to the u.s. if china persists refusing to follow international trade rules. >> question. both president obama's and governor romney's positions on china are they solid and presidential in scope and in content? >>> tim? >> it is silly politics. this is what every politician does. they campaign like pat buchanan, frankly, as a nationalist, and they govern as free traders as internationalists. these guys are not going to wage a trade war in china this is tough talk to win ohio. >> you want to defend yourself. >> i am an economic patriot and economic nationalist and obama is using my phrase. but i belie
to take out bad cases, but they need to be hitting targets, and it's not so much the technology. >> anybody else have a question or anybody want to answer the question. >> do you think we should fighting war against the terrorist at this point or should we not, and if you do, is the way we're going about it an effective way or a way to cause -- those are the two big questions. i happen to think that if you -- what i think al-qaeda's still a problem, i grant that it is a difficult political problem for a president to say we won, and it's over. if you say it prematurely, get attacked next week, that's the end of your presidency. it's going to be over before somebody says that. >> lick benghazi. >> it happened, you know? that was local militants, not al-qaeda from above, but people, lose distinctions quickly in terms of politics, but i think there's still a reason to use them now. i don't think we're at the point yet where there's no cost. there's no reason not to use it. you want to be careful about the incentive question that you're not treating it like a hammer and everything li
but also information technology improvements that have made things possible that were not available in the past. but a lot of these programs are under pressure now. some of it is so explicit political attacks aimed at outreach programs and aimed at the policies that have made it easier for people and on the programs. we also know the state agencies are stretched very thin. there are a lot of demands on them and their funding has been caught and in some we're hearing stories of unemployment insurance and people calling and calling to apply for their benefits and just getting a busy signal over and over again. it is a real opportunity to think about how we can build on the progress we've made so far. how can we prevent it from wearing away and what improvements can we make in the future. in particular, the affordable care act or the health care reform presents an opportunity to make some improvements as we move forward. i am going to wave to reports also available outside of the coalition. one is specifically how the human service programs and their clients can benefit from health car
could do and bringing new technologies to north dakota. when i served on the commission and attorney general, i went to minnesota and hard-fought for the coal industry. i heard a lignite leader award. i am as committed to north dakota's energy industry as anyone can become a and i did not know there could be a better advocate and someone who would stand and say have been there, i have this experience, i can get the job done, and i a understand what those challenges are. that is what i am hoping to do when i go to washington, d.c., represent this growing industry and include in it biofuels and wind which the republican party has been very hostile to production tax credits. using every form of energy to make it work in this country. >> obviously, there is a problem. keystone is not built. it is not built because the senate majority leader has not brought it up for a vote. our president has been a post it as well. our coal industry, one of the things that has stunned me is the epa came out with new regulations on coal plants, and it was so stringent you could not build a new coal plant
things that we have we learned a because of technology and other allies in the past decade. as as a continual demand, it seems for the resources to get adequate training and to keep to a readiness at the same time dealing with other things that makes this a much more complex issue than many might appreciate and one of the challenges is when it comes time to resources it is done adequately. sorry for the op-ed. but it's really important, and i found in my experience people don't quite understand this because they are not supposed to and i don't expect that they would know. >> tell me a little bit about in your experience what particular things in the tour by difficulties in the military you think have been particularly useful or would be useful in the situations to fight and extend security in the non-traditional ways. >> i can answer that in a lot of different ways. let me start with disaster response. there's been a lot of discussion and a lot of groups over the last eight or ten years about how does the military or other branches of the government, ngos, private enterpris
with advanced keyless technology. control everything from your pocket, purse, or wherever. that's the power of german engineering. ♪ that dirty, old egg-suckin' dog ♪ >>> bunniga, bung a, women, bribery, tax embezzlement, right for a video, but they're putting firmer prime minister berlusconi behind bars for years. he was sentenced for tax fraud involving his media company and swiss bank account. berlusconi has survived, as you know, a series of scandals, and now he's vowing to survive another saying he wants to return to politics. here to give us insight, our editorial producer, nadia bilchik. good morning. >> good morning. yes, as you said, he is not going to go to jail. >> right. that's the thing. he's sentenced to four years. the likelihood of him serving is nil? >> there's so many loopholes. the appeals process, also, in italy, for someone over 70 years old, the judge can have house arrest. and in 2006, there was an italian law that reduces prison sentences. if anything it will be a couple of months under house arrest. >> what else is going on with him? let's go there. >> yes. berl
a future. persistent technology here in western massachusetts, this is a real opportunity for the future. only if there is a well-educated work force. that starts and home school, on into community colleges, and on into universities. i want to say this is about priorities. that is how i see it. there will not be a single, magic bullet. what the priorities. students will have to pick up more of the costs of student loans. twice, senator brown voted to let students rates double. why? it would have forced to pay for it closing a loophole used by millionaires. it is called the newt gingrich loophole. what are your priorities? protecting loopholes for millionaires or college education? >> great question. the cost of education is out of sight. we need to have an educated student population. my youngest daughter graduated. i understand. one of the largest driving forces behind the high cost of education is administrative costs. professor war makes about $350 thousand to teach a course. she got a zero interest loan and gets perks. it is interesting. kids are forced to go out and borrow money at
as the technology changes it's pretty straightforward to go to a website and put in a cred card number. so the campaigns have followed that and that was successful for the obama campaign and continues to be this year. you can raise big contributions too. it's important to remember that direct contributions to the candidate are still limits. -- still limited. only $2500 per election so $5,000 per candidate. and there are prohibitions on who can give money to the candidates. corporations,unions are not permitted to make contributions. that's been the law for more than 40 years and it still is. they're about to spend their own money independently of the campaign if they want to but they can't make contributions. presidential candidates raise money at the national level. -- a maximum levels. there are a loft of wealthy individuals who support them. so the obama campaign stands out in that respect a little bit. the caller is making another point which is that the money in this race this year has been much more focused in many respects on a small number of individual people. the attention in thi
years. we all went to those panels. and i feel like things changed so quickly, the technology has changed things around late, think academia has a very hard time keeping up. and knowing what to tell young journalists to come to the scope what issue do. a year ago they should do everything. this year i'm reading a slew of articles i know, i want specialists again. so i think that's part of what's happening is the world of him in such a rapid pace. >> we also have this switch that with such robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as applied to media was to protect quality, to enforce quality, and to talk about best practices. with the death of the media industry, i mean, it is a death. the grass are just shocking. the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values, the vigilance and other things we care about. and so that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it can't just be about best practices, these great stories rewrote, that that sort of thi thing. >> if you want to become a documentary film maker, where'd y
nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in syria quite a bit over the years, but in the new circumstances of the arab spring, and the regime didn't under the new circumstances -- it just grew and grew and grew after that. and it unleashed -- i think this
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)